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Showing posts from March, 2019

Why Do Some Of Our Stanchions Have Holes?

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The Case of the Mysterious Holes In 1905, with the blessing of the NYC Board of Aldermen, 24 ornamental brick pillars were erected to mark the boundaries of the new Prospect Park South development. Each had their street name engraved at the top, just below stone flower pots, with a monogrammed “PPS” on every side.  1905: PPS Pillars Approved 2016: PPS Pillar on Argyle Road Over the next 20 years, Midwood Park, Fiske Terrace and West South Midwood would follow suit, although none featured monograms and our forefathers opted for the trim line without engraved street names.  2018: Ocean & Glenwood 2018: Foster Ave & E 17th St Ours once featured flower pots (per 1983 photos) but after rampant crazy drivers took out stanchion after stanchion, the replacements were topped with white stone globes. Still, we out-pillar Ditmas Park and Beverly Square which have no pillars at all. Tsk, tsk, tsk.  1983: SE Corner Westminster Rd & Foster Ave 1983:

The Stories Your House Could Tell: 1315 Glenwood Road

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A for Albemarle, G for Glenwood In 1901 at the request of the Germania realty company, the Board of Aldermen voted to rename “Avenue G” Glenwood Road. And just as another realtor, Dean Alvord, had managed to transform “Avenue A” into Albemarle Road two years earlier, Glenwood Road would soon become the centerpiece of a new development then being carved out of the Lott Woods, from Flatbush Avenue to Coney Island Avenue.  1901: December 15. Brooklyn Eagle . Anglophilia Grips Developers After Germania had cut down the trees and laid out the streets, it created a central garden mall on Glenwood, patterned after Alvord’s Albemarle Road, forming a southern bookend to Victorian Flatbush. Then it installed gas/electric/sewer lines to each empty lot, created sidewalks and paved the roads. By the Fall of 1905, quite a few new houses had already been erected on Glenwood Road, many by master builder John Corbin and his architect, Benjamin Dreisler. In fact, Dreisler himself had just mov